Sorghum Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Blondies

What is an easy way to convert a popular wheat flour recipe to gluten free? And ensure it is successful, with a soft texture, and even whole grain?


sorghum, peanut butter, chocolate chip blondies photo by vsimon

Three steps to convert a baked treat to gluten free.

  1. Substitute whole grain sorghum flour for the wheat flour, measure for measure.
  2. Add xanthan. Start with 1 teaspoon per 1 cup flour.
  3. Add some water to batter if it seems too stiff. Xanthan needs water to hydrate it. There was no water in the original recipe. I started with a tablespoon, that didn’t seem like enough. I added another and it looked good. Bingo, it cooked up perfectly.

Texture, yeah! It is good!

Not dry, not crumbly, not gooey, not slimy.

These bars are light textured, yet they compress to a pleasant chewiness when you bite into them.

It is fun to serve them with extra chopped peanuts and chocolate chips. (These are not included in the ingredients below.)

This blondie is soft and holds together well. So you can press the edge of the bar into the extra tasty bits on the plate and they stick.  Interactive food, I like that.


If there are any bars left over, they last several days without getting dry. Be sure to cover them tightly though.

You can also double the recipe and freeze some for later. Bake in two 8×8 inch pans, or one 9×13 inch pan. When I double the recipe I use 3 whole eggs, instead of 2 whole eggs and 2 egg whites. It is just easier.

Additional changes

I added chopped peanuts to the original recipe for more crunch and flavor. And reduced the total sugar, switching to dark brown sugar instead of white sugar. These are still plenty sweet for me.

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Blondies

Adapted from Cooking Light

Yield 16 servings

Ingredients Metric measures
1 cup sorghum flour 135 gm
1 teaspoon xanthan 4 gm
1/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips 45 gm
¼ cup chopped peanuts 30 gm
1/4 teaspoon baking soda 2 gm
1/8 teaspoon salt pinch
3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar 180 gm
1/4 cup peanut butter 65 gm
1 tablespoon vegetable oil 15 ml
1 teaspoon vanilla extract 5 ml
1 large egg 50 gm
1 large egg white 25 gm
2 tablespoons water 30 ml

Preheat oven to 350°.

Oil the bottom of an 8-inch square baking pan (do not coat sides of pan).

Lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife.

Combine flour, xanthan, chocolate chips, soda, and salt in a medium bowl.

Combine sugar and remaining ingredients in a bigger bowl; stir until well-blended. Add flour mixture, mixing thoroughly.

Spread batter in prepared pan.

Bake for 25-30 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out almost clean.

Cool on a wire rack. Cut into 16 squares.

Allergic to peanuts?

I have not tried tree nut or seed butters in the recipe, but I think they would work. Please let us know if you try them and how you like the result.

W is for Waffles- Quinoa Cocoa

We eat waffles often at our house. But rarely for breakfast. Too much fuss, too early in the bleary a.m. It is breakfast for dinner, or lunch. The waffles might be amaranth, buckwheat, corn, Montina, teff, or simply Bob’s Red Mill gluten free flour. I use whatever I have. I started all of this long ago, with a buttermilk wheat recipe and experimented with every single gluten free flour I could get my hands on. It has also proven to be a nice way to use up bits of leftover flour, all mixed up. Every combo, of this and that, has been eagerly eaten.

waffles (2a)


photo by vsimon

The latest batches have gluten free and dairy free. Amazake works nicely, but it is expensive and hard to come by. Apple juice is a convenient and inexpensive solution. Gluten free, dairy free, both, any way, it is always a treat. Waffles with fruit and nuts is one of my very favorite meals.

Tuesday lunch in the garden

It was sunny and warm. Perfect for Quinoa Cocoa Waffles with chocolate syrup and raspberries picked from the back of our yard.

Sometimes I feel claustrophobic walking through our garden. The berry patch is huge, 30 feet by 15 feet. The canes reach to my shoulder and you must be careful not to inhale the clouds of mosquitoes that reside there. The amaranth is to my chin, just starting to bud. The pole bean tee-pees are seven feet tall and the vines are twirling together over the tops. Looking out over this lushness makes me feel rich. And peaceful. We have plenty, more than enough.

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pole-bean-tee-pees photo by vsimon

So the simple waffles just enhanced my contentment. A light crispy crunch, rich chocolate syrup, bright tangy berries. Chocolate for lunch, overlooking abundance, what could be better?

Quinoa Cocoa Waffles

serves 2 metric measures
2 tablespoons cocoa 12 g
7/8 cup quinoa flour 110 g
1 tablespoon sugar 15 g
1 teaspoon baking powder 4 g
1/2 teaspoon baking soda 3 g
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup apple juice
3 g
180 ml
1 egg 50 g
2 tablespoons oil 30 ml

Preheat waffle maker.

Preheat oven to 150 degrees.

Put 2 tablespoons cocoa in a 1 cup dry measuring cup. Add quinoa flour to the top and level with a knife. You’ll have 7/8 of a cup of quinoa flour. Add sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Combine well.

In a small bowl, whisk together apple juice, egg and oil.

Add juice mixture to quinoa flour mixture and whisk until smooth.

Pour into the waffle maker and bake until the steam stops. Remove waffle from the maker and place right on the oven rack to keep crispy while the second waffle cooks.

Serve with your favorite chocolate syrup. I simply microwaved semisweet chocolate with some oil until it melted, for a super rich and low carb sauce.

These would be equally lovely with a peach sauce. What kind of waffles and sauce do you like best?

We are happy to submit this post to Andrea’s Recipes Grow Your Own recipe round up. GYO celebrates home grown foods, something we can all be proud of. Thanks Andrea for hosting!

S is for Sorghum

Sorghum is my new favorite all purpose gluten free flour. I cannot use it straight up to replace wheat flour in every recipe. But it works in many. I also like that my regular grocery store stocks it now, it is not crazy expensive, it is easy to work with, and it’s whole grain. It is not a nutritional super food, but it sure beats refined starches.

Sorghum flour is successful in pancakes (recipe below), waffles, muffins, piecrust, and fruit crisp toppings. The flavor has some natural sweetness. And I am in love with sorghum syrup, which is made from sorghum stalks. They look and stand tall just like corn stalks.

Pancakes with sorghum syrup, fruit and a sprinkling of nuts for dinner is true comfort food for me. If you have sorghum flour on hand, you probably have the other essential ingredients in your pantry. 100% sorghum flour pancakes are a great introduction to sorghum.

I do make a special trip to the health food store to by 6 jars of syrup at time. It is thicker and not as sweet as pure maple syrup. Perfect for my taste. A mix of sorghum syrup and corn syrup is available in my regular grocery store. But I don’t want the corn syrup part. Just 100% sorghum syrup please.

My “go to” recipe for pancakes includes buttermilk, nice thick buttermilk. But I do not always have it so I substitute soured milk with tasty results.

Please notice, I use soured milk, not spoiled milk. You simply add a tablespoon of acid, like lemon juice or vinegar, to a measuring cup. Then add milk to the one-cup line. Stir and allow to sit for a few minutes and you will notice the milk curdles. That is soured milk.

Right now, there are many posts and comments in the blogosphere regarding the safety of distilled vinegar. Please see Gluten Free NYC and Tricia Thompson’s blog post on There is a simple solution if you choose not to use distilled vinegar, use lemon juice. You get a similar tart flavor, acid and no gluten.

I used cows’ milk, but you could try this with other kinds of milk. Goat, hemp, nut, rice or soy. I am interested to know if you try any of these and how you like the results. The lower protein milks probably will not curdle. But you still need to add the acid to make the baking soda fizz and raise up the pancakes.

The finished soured milk pancakes are a bit thinner than the buttermilk version. And the batter itself thinned while I was cooking the pancakes. The first pancakes cooked up evenly round. The later, thinner batter made scalloped pancakes that looked a bit like pretty flower petals. They all tasted great.

sour-milk-sorghum-pancake photo by vsimon

Sour Milk Sorghum Pancakes with Sorghum Syrup and Blueberries

Serves 2                                               Metric measures

1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar       15 ml  

   (not malt or flavored vinegar)

nearly 1 cup milk                                   225 ml

2/3 cup sorghum flour                           75 gm

1 teaspoon sugar                                  5 gm

1 teaspoon baking soda                         4 gm

½ teaspoon salt                                    3 gm

1 egg                                                    1

2 tablespoons oil                                   30 ml

1 cup blueberries                                   130 gm

sorghum syrup

Measure lemon juice or vinegar into a one cup liquid measuring cup. Add milk to the 1-cup line. Stir and allow to sit for about 5 minutes.

In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, soda, and salt.

In a small bowl whisk together soured milk, egg, and oil.

Add milk mixture to flour mixture, whisk until smooth.


stirring-out-the-lumps-in-sour-milk-sorghum-pancake-batter photo by vsimon

Preheat griddle and oil it. Ladle enough batter onto the griddle to make a 3-4” pancake. Do not make them too big, or they will be very hard to flip. Drop blueberries onto the batter. Cook until bubbles form on the surface. Flip and cook a few minutes more.

Adding the blueberries to the batter on the griddle evenly distributes the berries, and keeps the color of the pancakes lovely. Stirring the blueberries into the batter in the bowl can make the pancakes an unappealing grayish blue. This is a bigger problem with frozen berries as they thaw.

sourmilk (13)

sorghum-pancake-with-blueberries photo by vsimon

Sorghum has also saved the day for gluten free beer. Beer with pancakes?  Ick. No, I usually have tea or milk. I do not drink much beer so I cannot comment on sorghum beer. Other than, I think it is cool that it is available.

What wonderful things have you made with any type of sorghum?

Update 8-30-2009  This post was entered into the Slightly Indulgent Monday kick off blog event, started by Amy Green of  Simply Sugar and Gluten Free. The whole grain sorghum flour and the rich syrup make this slightly indulgent. I can’t wait to see what else is entered!