W is for Waffles- Quinoa Cocoa

We eat waffles often at our house. But rarely for breakfast. Too much fuss, too early in the bleary a.m. It is breakfast for dinner, or lunch. The waffles might be amaranth, buckwheat, corn, Montina, teff, or simply Bob’s Red Mill gluten free flour. I use whatever I have. I started all of this long ago, with a buttermilk wheat recipe and experimented with every single gluten free flour I could get my hands on. It has also proven to be a nice way to use up bits of leftover flour, all mixed up. Every combo, of this and that, has been eagerly eaten.

waffles (2a)

quinoa-cocoa-waffles-with-chocolate-syrup-and-raspberries

photo by vsimon

The latest batches have gluten free and dairy free. Amazake works nicely, but it is expensive and hard to come by. Apple juice is a convenient and inexpensive solution. Gluten free, dairy free, both, any way, it is always a treat. Waffles with fruit and nuts is one of my very favorite meals.

Tuesday lunch in the garden

It was sunny and warm. Perfect for Quinoa Cocoa Waffles with chocolate syrup and raspberries picked from the back of our yard.

Sometimes I feel claustrophobic walking through our garden. The berry patch is huge, 30 feet by 15 feet. The canes reach to my shoulder and you must be careful not to inhale the clouds of mosquitoes that reside there. The amaranth is to my chin, just starting to bud. The pole bean tee-pees are seven feet tall and the vines are twirling together over the tops. Looking out over this lushness makes me feel rich. And peaceful. We have plenty, more than enough.

garden (3)

pole-bean-tee-pees photo by vsimon

So the simple waffles just enhanced my contentment. A light crispy crunch, rich chocolate syrup, bright tangy berries. Chocolate for lunch, overlooking abundance, what could be better?

Quinoa Cocoa Waffles

serves 2 metric measures
2 tablespoons cocoa 12 g
7/8 cup quinoa flour 110 g
1 tablespoon sugar 15 g
1 teaspoon baking powder 4 g
1/2 teaspoon baking soda 3 g
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup apple juice
3 g
180 ml
1 egg 50 g
2 tablespoons oil 30 ml

Preheat waffle maker.

Preheat oven to 150 degrees.

Put 2 tablespoons cocoa in a 1 cup dry measuring cup. Add quinoa flour to the top and level with a knife. You’ll have 7/8 of a cup of quinoa flour. Add sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Combine well.

In a small bowl, whisk together apple juice, egg and oil.

Add juice mixture to quinoa flour mixture and whisk until smooth.

Pour into the waffle maker and bake until the steam stops. Remove waffle from the maker and place right on the oven rack to keep crispy while the second waffle cooks.

Serve with your favorite chocolate syrup. I simply microwaved semisweet chocolate with some oil until it melted, for a super rich and low carb sauce.

These would be equally lovely with a peach sauce. What kind of waffles and sauce do you like best?

We are happy to submit this post to Andrea’s Recipes Grow Your Own recipe round up. GYO celebrates home grown foods, something we can all be proud of. Thanks Andrea for hosting!

B is for Buckwheat

At our house, we love breakfast for dinner. And 100% buckwheat waffles are often our go to choice. I do not use 16 different flours, just buckwheat flour. No need for gums either. I adapted a popular buckwheat and wheat pancake recipe so it is now gluten free and much, much lower in fat.
You can easily make pancakes with this recipe. I just think waffles are more fun and I do not mind taking a bit of extra time at dinner. I also like to fill all the little holes with tasty toppings. These buckwheat waffles are light and fluffy on the inside, crispy on the outside. Please do not let the color of the raw batter alarm you. It is gray with black specks. But it browns nicely as it cooks.
Like many whole foods, buckwheat is a nutrition powerhouse. One-half cup of flour is about 200 calories, only 2 grams fat, 6 grams fiber, and 7 grams high quality protein. It offers a wide range of nutrients. Notably, thiamin, niacin, B6, iron, copper, magnesium and manganese.
Best Buckwheat Buttermilk Waffles
Adapted from Buttermilk Pancakes ll at AllRecipes
Serves 2
1 cup buckwheat flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
1 cup buttermilk
1 egg
2 tablespoons oil
Preheat waffle maker. And preheat oven to 150 degrees, or the lowest setting.
Mix dry ingredients (flour through salt) in a large bowl.
Mix liquid ingredients (buttermilk though oil) a medium bowl. Add to dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.
My waffle maker makes two 4.5 inch square Belgium waffles. Belgium waffles are thicker than standard waffles. I put one third of the batter into the maker three times. You might put more or less batter in at a time. Try not to overfill the wells or the batter will ooze out and make a big aggravating mess.
Cook waffles until steam no longer comes from the waffle machine. As each waffle is done, place in oven, right on the bare rack. This keeps them crispy.
Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer. They can be warmed in the toaster on a medium setting.
My favorite way to serve them is with some chocolate chips on top, all nice and melty. Then raspberry sauce, which are simply pureed berries from our garden that we freeze to use all year round. And some syrup, either sorghum or maple. Wow, what a treat.
The Worlds Healthiest Foods reports that regularly eating buckwheat helps control blood sugar. And it lowers total serum cholesterol, reduces LDL cholesterol (the bad kind), and improves the ratio of HDL (the good kind) to total cholesterol. Not bad for a silly looking seed.
Despite the wheat name, buckwheat is gluten free. The triangle shaped seeds are called groats, or kasha if they are roasted. Buckwheat is important in eastern European and Chinese cuisine. Today we feature a central European delight, Belgium waffles. You can also make simple All-American pancakes with the same recipe.