Carrot Soup, Carrot Soup, and more Carrot Soup.

This years crop of carrots has been the best yet.  With most of the vegetable garden put to bed for the winter,  I dug up half of my carrot crop. carrots2

Trimmed the tops and gave them a fast hose cleaning.

A couple of months ago I tested out a few carrot soup recipes.  And today I set out to turn a pile of carrots into carrot soup to put into my freezer.

The three recipes I made are: Curried Carrot Soup, courtesy of Rachael Ray, Roasted Carrot Soup, from Donna Hay magazine, and Moroccan Carrot Soup,  from A Sweet Spoonful.  For the most part I follow recipes, but I make small changes as I go based on my ingredients on hand and my personal likes.  The recipes are only a guide line.


The smells coming from my kitchen today where fantastic.  From the sweet smell of freshly dug carrots to roasting onions, to fennel sautéing in olive oil.   And then there is the smell of curry.


roasted2I start with Roasted Carrot Soup as it needs to roast in the oven for at least 30 minutes.   You roast the carrots, an onion and garlic lightly coated in olive oil, seasoned with salt, pepper and cumin.  






After about 45 minutes in a 350 oven the carrots are roasted and tender. 






roasted6This is combined with vegetable stock and chicken stock in a large pot and pureed with an immersion blender.   Add a cup of sour cream and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes.   Salt and pepper to taste.






After cooling, I package for the freezer in 2 and 2 1/2 cup containers for use later.






The next recipe is the Curried Carrot Soupcurreyed2

This is similar to the first recipe except the carrots, and onions are sautéed and simmered in broth instead of roasted.







This recipe has the most spices going on.  I cut down a bit on the amount of curry and switched the cayenne pepper to chipotle pepper.






Again the soup is processed with an immersion blender and simmered again with the addition of sour cream.






While this may look like the roasted carrot soup, one taste and you will not mix them up.  This is spicy, this is hot.  This soup has kick to it.   Because not everyone likes as much heat as I do, next time I’ll cut the pepper amount in half.



And now on to the Moroccan Carrot Soup.  


moroccan1This soup has more complex flavorings with the addition of sweet potatoes, and an apple added to the carrots.   And a dash  of lemon juice at the end.







But we start by sautéing fennel seeds in olive oil, then add the carrots, apple, sweet potato and sauté them as well for a few minutes.





Then like the others, vegetable and chicken stock is added and the soup is simmered until all vegetables are tender.






Remove the bay leaf and puree with my stick blender until smooth.  Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. 

Cool and package for freezer.



So now I have enough carrot soup in the freezer to get through to next carrot season.carrotsall

New Direction

Because of the continued activity by you the users, I have decided to keep this blog site online for a while longer.   All of Linda’s old posts and recipes will remain and continue to be accessible. 

But any new posts that I add will NOT necessarily be Gluten-Free related.  So if you wish not to receive new posting notifications I will not be offended if you remove yourself from this blogs feed updates.  You can still always return to the blog site and access the old Gluten-Free related content. 


My new postings will be more related to My Back Yard: and where I am getting my food and how I am processing and preparing it.   It may be gluten-free, but not necessarily.   So hang around if you want.  The writing style will surely be different from what you were use to.   And please do continue to access Linda’s gluten-free materials.

The End

Gluten Free Kitchen Therapy began as a spin-off of our personal chef business, Dine In!, because a client was diagnosed with celiac disease.  Along with that Linda did speaking engagements to spread her knowledge of gluten-free, and recipe testing to make gluten-free better tasting and better for you.    We did cooking demonstrations to show people how to make gluten-free good for you and tasty.  She invested time and energy to get local restaurants to offer gluten-free items on their menus AND to have the knowledge and policies in place to avoid cross contamination.


Eventually became our main website.   In addition to the website design, I learned to use and program WordPress, and thus Linda’s blog was born (   We spent many hours video taping and editing cooking demonstrations that were offered on this site.   There was a lot of effort in making great photos of the dishes, as she always told me, we eat with our eyes first.  But mainly it was Linda’s great writing that made this site come to life.   Her dietetic training and personal chef experience added creditability to her content, but it was her writing style and quest for knowledge that got people to return again and again to her blog.  The videos and speaking engagements never became financially lucrative, but they where fun along the way.

I wish to thank all her blog readers for their many years of subscribing, for it was you who kept Linda going with the blog.   She really enjoyed coming up with the next posting even when time and energy were not abundant.    Linda was very disappointed when the cancer treatments no longer allowed her to think or write to the standards that she had set for herself.   “Chemo Brain” is a real problem.

And please read Linda’s account of her journey with cancer at

Thus we come to the end of Linda’s blog.

 Thank you all.

Vincent Simon