Timtana Spice Muffins and Giveaway

timtana spice muffins

timtana spice muffins photo by vsimon

Please let me introduce you to timtana, a new gluten free whole grain flour. It is dark and handsome. A flour with substance.

Montana Gluten Free Processors are working with the Celiac Sprue Association, who called for volunteers to develop recipes for timtana flour. I like to try new foods and answered the call. They sent me a free #3 bag of timtana flour to work with.

Timtana flour is ground from a perennial grain, the plants grow every year without needing to be planted each spring.  Most other flours are from annual grains.

High protein

Timtana has more protein than amaranth, buckwheat, oat, millet, quinoa, rice, sorghum, and teff flours. Timtana is 5 grams of protein per 1/4 cup. The other flours are  3 or 4 grams. Refined starches, such as tapioca or corn, have zero protein.

High fiber

Timtana flour also has more fiber than the above gluten free flours, 5 grams per 1/4 cup. Compare that with 1 to 4 grams for other flours. Refined starches have zero fiber too.

Calcium and iron

Yep, timtana has them. Comparable to amaranth and teff flours. Refined starches? Zero again.

Easy to use? Too soon to tell.

I am batting .500 using timtana. The spice muffins worked great the first time. Pancakes did not, those need more work.

3 Giveaways, you may get to try it too.

Montana Gluten Free Processors want more people to play with timtana. So they are giving 3 lucky folks each a free #3 bag of flour.

Simply comment below by Wednesday, January 6. Winners will selected by random generator and announced Thursday, January 7. 

Dedicated gluten free producers.

I always like to know the farm to table story. From the Montana Gluten Free Producers website.

Our products are manufactured in a dedicated state of the art gluten free facility that only processes and packages our own gluten free products. The story however doesn’t begin there, to be truly gluten free you must start in the field. Montana Gluten Free Processors works directly with traditional farmers to grow our private seed stock on ground with at least 4 years history of no gluten grains being produced on the field. Only production from our proven healthy seed stock is acceptable for Montana Gluten Free production. Crops are planted, fields are inspected, and harvested, storage and transportation equipment is dedicated and inspected to insure purity and quality. We watch over our product from the field to the package to be certain that the product in our package is the best all natural gluten free product food you can buy.

Success!

Today I share my success. What I call Timtana Spice Muffins originated as pumpkin walnut muffins in Gourmet November 1997.

We offered our first gluten free client pumpkin muffins, made with Bob’s Red Mill gluten free blend flour. She said, repeatedly, we should open a gluten free bakery. Starting with those muffins.

I like to take a good recipe and make it better. Really, I love when that happens.

Timtana flour improves the nutrition and changes the flavor a bit. The pumpkin flavor disappears. Sweet spice, the flavor and the fragrance, now predominate. So I changed simply the name. 🙂

Simplify if you like.

Admittedly, this is along list of ingredients. You might omit the dates and walnuts, but I wouldn’t.

And you can substitute 2 teaspoons of pumpkin pie spice if you do not like to measure out 4 different spices.

Timtana Spice Muffins

Yield: 12 metric measures
3/4 cup solid pack canned pumpkin 180 gm
1/2 cup oil 120 ml
1/4 cup buttermilk 60 ml
2 large eggs 100 ml
3 tablespoons molasses 45 gm
2 cups Timtana flour 240 gm
3/4 cup dark brown sugar 150 gm
1 1/2 tsp baking powder 6 gm
1 teaspoon xanthan 4 gm
1 teaspoon cinnamon 3 gm
1/2 tsp ginger 1 gm
1/4 tsp ground cloves 2 pinches
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg 1 pinch
1/2 tsp salt 4 gm
1/4 teaspoon soda 2 gm
3/4 cup chopped dates 120 gm
3/4 cup chopped walnuts 90 gm

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

In a bowl, whisk pumpkin, oil, buttermilk, eggs and molasses.

In a large bowl, whisk timtana flour, dark brown sugar, baking powder, xanthan, spices, salt, and baking soda.

Add liquid ingredients and mix thoroughly.

Add dates and walnuts, combine well.

Divide equally into 12 muffin papers.

Allow to rest for 10 minutes so the xanthan can hydrate.

Bake for 20 minutes. Turn heat down to 350 and bake 10 more minutes.

More Timtana Recipes

Montana Gluten Free Processors has more recipes at their website.

And Gluten Free for Good has a recipe for Timtana Montana Orange Muffins.

The Montana Celiac Society has a recipe for Timtana Bagels.

What recipe would you like to try? Please share, and remember to comment for a chance to win.

Update 1-7-10 And the winners are:

Porsha, Danica, and Janice. Congratulations!!!

Cocoa Cherry Muesli

cocoa cherry muesli

cocoa cherry muesli photo by vsimon

Need some more gluten free gift ideas from your kitchen?

This is a treat, some will say, an extravagant gift. Certified gluten free oats, dried cherries, and almonds are not inexpensive ingredients. But they are healthy, delicious, and combine to make an easy gift. Worthy of a splurge.

What is the difference between muesli and granola?

Both are a combination of grains, usually oatmeal, fruit, and nuts. Very few are made with certified gluten free oats, be sure to check the label.

Most granola for sale has lots, really lots, of oil and sweeteners added. These help to make crunchy clusters, but also add many calories.

Muesli simply means “mixture” in German. Our take on breakfast muesli is less sweet than granola and has no added oils.

Serving suggestions

Your giftee can add their choice of milk in the morning, and watch it magically turn into chocolate milk.

Or they can add it at night and keep it all in the fridge, ready to pull out and enjoy in the morning. This soaked version will be softer, since the oatmeal and cherries absorb the liquid overnight.

Muesli can be served warm too. Simply add liquid and microwave like plain oatmeal.

Cocoa Cherry Muesli

makes 8-9 cups metric measures
6 cups certified gluten free oatmeal 550 gm
1 1/2 cups toasted whole almonds 225 gm
1/2 cup dark brown sugar 100 gm
1/2 cup pure cocoa powder, not cocoa drink mix 45 gm
1 1/2 cup dried cherries 225 gm

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Put oatmeal on an 18×12 inch rimmed baking sheet. Or two smaller ones.

Toast oatmeal for about 10 minutes. Stir and bake about 10 minutes more. You may not need to bake this long if using two baking sheets.

Transfer toasted oatmeal to a cool baking sheet, or a large bowl.

Add the almonds, dark brown sugar, and cocoa powder. Stir to thoroughly combine. 

Add cherries and stir just a turn or two. Additional stirring will cause the cherries to pick up brown cocoa coats. This is not bad, but they are prettier unadorned.

When the muesli is completely cool, package in holiday tins. Just add a bow, and give with a smile.

What flavors do you like in muesli or granola?

Giving Thanks for Gluten Free Grains in the Garden

Do you know anyone else who has grown any gluten free grains in their backyard garden? No? Neither do we.

That didn’t stop us. We planted amaranth, sorghum, teff, and flax this year. Just as in the rest of the garden, there were some successes and some we will not repeat.

Even though we will not plant most of these next year, we enjoyed trying them. We know our grains are organic. We know they are not contaminated with wheat. We built up our internal supply of vitamin D. 😉 Our pantry is full. We have a small plot of fertile land. These are all good things. Things we are very thankful for.

We encourage you to grow a garden, or to grow something next year. Please share with us what you grow. It is such a rewarding experience, and you will have much to be thankful for too.

I cook with all of these grains and seeds, and have posted before with recipes. I’ll add a garden review here, and you can click on links for previous posts.

amaranth flower

amaranth flower photo by vsimon

Amaranth

Amaranth is the clear winner here. From just a small packet, it produced nearly 2 pounds of seeds, harvested over 2 months. We cook the seeds for hot breakfast cereal. And pop them for a tiny version of popcorn.

Early in the season, we also harvested the leaves and stems. Steamed tender young stems taste just like asparagus! Later in the year the leaves and stems get too tough to eat.

amarnath leaves-stems 003

young amaranth leaves and stems photo by lsimon

Amaranth is also worthy of planting in the flower garden. Ours got 8 feet tall, with striking flowers.

Flax

I don’t really consider flax a gluten free grain. It turned out to be the same as flax I had grown in the flower garden. It has airy leaves, with pretty little sky blue flowers. The thought of harvesting it hadn’t occurred to me before.

Vince ordered it this year from Bountiful Gardens, where it was listed with grains. And I often add ground flax seed in gluten free baking. So he thinks of it as a gluten free grain.

flax plant with seed heads

flax gone to seed photo by vsimon

We didn’t get much of a harvest, only 3 oz. A ground squirrel was well fed though, he ate more than we did. It is far easier to buy flax seed in the store. And so we do.

White Seeded Popping Sorghum

We love sorghum, flour and syrup. The plant looks just like corn stalks with an exploded ear of corn at the top.

sorghum-plant

sorghum plant photo by vsimon

In our cold wet spring, it germinated very poorly. But once it took hold, it was fun to watch. We harvested over 4 pounds of seeds.

I won’t be making flour out of it. I don’t have the equipment and this really is not enough. We aren’t boiling down the stems for syrup either. That is just too hard core for me.

sorghum (9)

sorghum seeds, raw and cooked photo by vsimon

We have cooked the seeds in a slow cooker. It tastes just like corn, and smells just like cooked corn. The seeds are smaller, and creamy white.

It will be pleasant to wake up to a steamy, fragrant bowl of sorghum seeds for breakfast on a wintery morning.

They could be used for a grain side dish too. Like rice, or quinoa.

We tried popping them, without success, and despite the name. We tried several times, and tried several methods.

They did get toasty tasty though. I thought this could be a crunchy addition to trail mix. And we have a lot of seeds to use.

Still, no need to repeat these. We will buy our sorghum flour and syrup in the store next year. And we can live without the seeds.

Teff

The teff was sad. The teff grew well enough. It is short, only 3 feet tall. The leaves are soft and arching.

But the seeds are so tiny I don’t know how they are harvested. They just disappear. There are seeds in this picture. Really, there are. They are hard to see even up close.

teff plant (2)

teff plant with seeds photo by vsimon

We threshed the teff and got a whopping 1.2 ounces (1/4 cup) seed. And it is nearly impossible to clean the chaff away. If you blow on it, it goes, and so does the seed.

We will be buying teff seeds and flour in the store too.

Possibilities for next year

Maybe buckwheat, millet, and quinoa. We will keep you posted.

Update: Read Linda’s guest post on Mother Earth News.