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The Numbers (updated)

131 148 half pint jars

35 41 pint jars

30 pint and a half jars

40 quart jars

256 279 total jars

It was a lot of work to fill 256 279 jars, but I spread it out over the whole summer.  I started in April when the rhubarb is fresh and juicy, making “Old Recipe” Rhubarb Jam and Rhubarb Chutney.

Old Recipe Rhubarb Jam

Old Recipe Rhubarb Jam          photo by vsimon

Today I put the last of my fermented dill pickles into jars from the crock.

In between I have put up 91 jars of jams and jellies, 107 130 jars of pickles, 9 jars of relish, 40 jars of salsa/sauce, and even 9 jars of ketchup.  

We have packed away everything our garden could produce, from fresh rhubarb, red beets, green beans, red currents, lots of ground cherries, sweet peppers, hot peppers, and cucumbers.  

Three types of cucumbers that were new to me this year.   The best being the “Pearl” cucumbers.   Just so, so where the “Lemon” cucumbers (taste like regular cucumbers), and not to be planted again where the extremely small “Mexican Gherkins”.  More on the cucumbers later.

gherkins

Mexican Gherkins                         photo by vsimon

And there where new things to try this year.  For the first time I made salsa.  Not the crisp, freshly chopped refrigerated type, but the cooked and then canned type.   Also new this year was a shot at making ketchup.  Ketchup without all the sugar or high fructose corn syrup found in store bought ketchup.

After much searching I was able to locate (from my sister Betty) the recipe my mother used to make the most wonderful, sweet pickle relish.  I have a niece who used to request this yearly as a Christmas gift from my mother.  

The biggest “new” thing I tried this year was to pickle green beans.  We now have a total of 18 pints of pickled green beans.   Three or four varieties of green beans where used along with a variety of different spices trying to find the best combination. 

Here is a partial list of the spices used: dill,  fennel,  caraway,  garlic,  black pepper corns,  coriander,  turmeric,  and red pepper flakes.  

Until we sample all the varieties, I will not know which of these spice combinations worked best.  Some will be repeated next year and some most likely will not.

.Preserve Shelves

Our winter stockpile                            photo by vsimon

So here are the shelving units in our basement stocked with all the great foods to be enjoyed through coming months.  (Notice the water bath canner and the dehydrator on the lower right hand shelf.)

So, if after reading this you start to question Linda’s writing style, please note that this post is penned by me, Vincent. 

And it hasn’t quite ended yet as I still have a grocery bag full of sweet and hot peppers to put up.   Any suggestions?   Have a great pickled peppers recipe?  Or maybe an “all peppers” salsa?   Let me know.

Update 10-8-2010 Today I pickled my peppers. Three different recipes, 23 jars. Short Brine Peppers, Pickled Sweet Peppers, and Marinated Sweet Peppers. All from “The Joy Of Pickling“. We now have many gifts for the holidays. Hope everyone loves pickles, jams, and salsas.

3 Responses to “The Numbers (updated)”

  1. What an amazing pantry! It will serve you well for the winter. I love reading about your canning and GF adventures. Thanks for writing!

    Autumn

  2. Annie Kate says:

    Oh, I am so excited! Finally someone else who grows gf grains in the garden. How did you hull your sorghum? Ours is still decorating our living room from last year because it’s covered with a very hard red membrane.

    Our amaranth wasn’t ready in time for it to be harvested your way, but I’m picking it, putting the plumes in the dehydrator, and then I’ll try to rub it out like you did on your picture. So what if we have unripe grain; I’m sure it will cook up well anyhow.

    Our quinoa didn’t germinate at all.

    We haven’t added up our canning jars and freezer contents for the year yet, but I added 24 meals of leeks to the freezer today. :)

    We just pickle hot peppers like dill pickles, minus the dill. We have the skinny hungarian hot wax ones and just slice circles, keeping the seeds. It’s hot but pretty. One year we scraped the seeds out, but that is a lot of work and there’s always the possibility of getting yourself covered with the painful juice. Make sure you use thick gloves!

    Blessings

    Annie Kate

    • Vincent says:

      Annie Kate,
      Our sorghum was the popping type, so we did not have to hull it. I just wish it had popped better. The kernels where small, as I expected them to be, but they yielded very little for the work involved. Did not plant them again.
      And yes, I do where gloves with my HOT peppers. Now I must wait a month to see how they taste.

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