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Videos now online.

I have finally gotten around to putting some of Linda’s cooking videos online.  Under the tab “Your Pantry” you will find 2 series of instructional videos. 

Your Pantry

The first series is “After School Snacks”.  It consists of 5 new videos for making great gluten free after school snacks.

The second series is called “Gluten Free Whole Grain Quick Breads”.  It also has 5 different videos showing you how to make great whole grain quick breads that are all gluten free.

It always was Linda’s intent to have them available and be shared.

Dried Pole Beans

It has been a long time since I finished my harvest of dried beans.   They have all been shelled, sorted, and weighed.

All the pole beans are planted under tripods and trained to climb on twine.  Each planting consisted of 9 beans, planted 3 on a side.

2013-06-10 14.57.04

In addition to the pole beans I have planted other years, this year I added 6 new varieties.   They where selected based on their bean size.  (It is easier to shell large beans.) 

Here is their yield and some basic characteristics.

  • True Red Cranberry = 1 lb, 10 oz
    Similar to kidney bean flavor
    from the Abnaki Indians of Maine

trueredcranberry

 

  • Good Morning Stallard = 2 lbs.
    Sweeter meaty flavor, great for soups

goodmorningstallard

 

  • Speckled Cranberry = 10 oz.
    From England, a triple purpose bean,
    (snap bean, green shell, dried bean).

speckledcranberry

 

  • Hidatsa Shield Figure = 2 lbs. 3 oz.
    From the Hidatsa tribe of North Dakota.

hidatsashieldfigure

 

  • Brockton Horticulture = 1 lb., 14 oz.
    Took longer to cook,
    nutty flavor, from Brockton, Massachusetts.

brocktonhorticulture

 

  • Sunset Runner Beans = 2 lb., 5 oz.
    Smooth inner meat, chewy skin.

sunsetrunner

 

All total I harvested over 13 pounds of dried beans to be used in soups and other recipes.    For storage they where sealed in vacuum bags.

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2013-11-04 10.29.402013-11-04 10.27.54

 

While separating some of the beans to be used next year for planting I discovered that the beans I harvested are not the same shade as the beans I planted. 

2013-11-06 12.40.57

In this picture of 2 varieties, the beans on the left of each group are the beans that I planted.  The beans on the right of each group are the beans I harvested.    For some reason they have lost their dark tan coloring.  Next year I will plant some of the original beans and some of my harvested beans.  It will be interesting to see what I get.   Is the change because of my growing conditions or have my beans cross pollinated and changed.

 

The seeds I planted came from http://www.seedsavers.org/ .

Beans, Beans.

Garden update.   Each year I try and plant something different.  Last year I planted a half dozen different carrot varieties.   Thus I had carrot soup filling the freezer.  The year before it was Garden Huckleberries.   (One year of those was enough.)  And one year I planted grain substitutes; flax, amaranth, timothy, sorghum, millet, etc.  And while I like to try new tomatoes each year they just are unusual enough.

2013-07-17 17.34.09

This year the garden theme is dried beans.   More specifically climbing dried beans.  Other years I have planted Pink Lady, Red Lady, and Christmas Lima Beans.  But this year, in addition to those three, I have also planted:

Good Mother Stallard

Hidatsa Shield Figure

Brockton Horticulture

Speckled Cranberry

True Red Cranberry

and

Sunset Runner Beans

2013-07-17 17.36.22

And while they are all growing very well, the Pink Lady and Red Lady are still the hummingbirds favorites.

I selected these particular climbing beans because of the beans size.  Bigger is easier to shuck come fall.  Some also can be eaten as green beans, but I intend to use them solely for dried bean  production.

Harvest time will tell if I chose well or not.  More pictures then.

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